Post #5: Studio 1: Drawing What’s love Got to Do With It?

   We think we don’t know how to draw, BUT anyone can draw a LINE and anyone can scribble!

What is a LINE? It’s actually really quite simple, a visible mark moved across a surface (Fox & Schirrmacher, 2014)

Most of us doubted ourselves coming into this studio – I for one, know I would never describe myself as being able to draw. But really all it requires is a little focus and some steady hand coordination (or not). Check out our sketches that we created in class.

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Left-hand portrait -Rhema
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Left-hand portrait done by Nejood
Left-hand portrait -Nejood

We dived into this one using our non-dominant hand (yep that’s right). Here are some examples from our group members showing individuality, process and product.

Scribbling

As ECEs we will be working with younger children. Who doesn’t love to scribble more than our little ones!

Did you know we can scribble in process?

Scribbling enabled us to observe the details and express what we saw according to our unique perceptions. Learning from this process, you see how important it is for educators to ensure that children feel that there is no right and wrong in art.

 

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Scribbling -Rhema
Scribbling done by Rhema
Scribbling – Rhema
 Scribbling done by Rhema
Scribbling – Rhema
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Scribbling -Nejood
Scribbling done by Nejood
Scribbling -Nejood
Scribbling done by Nejood
Scribbling -Nejood
Scribbling done by Nimra
Scribbling – Nimra
Scribbling done by Nimra
Scribbling – Nimra
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Scribbling – Nimra

Draw the music! Drawing is simple, scribbling and doodling can also be emotional as our feelings drive movement in our hands with the music creating different types of lines. Think about how you are feeling and draw it. Lines can vary, being smooth, jagged, curved, straight, fast, slow, long short, crossed, diagonal, among many more (Fox & Shirrmacher, 2014, p.123). It does not necessarily need to be an animate drawing and I have learnt that drawing various lines was extremely soothing for me. At first I had no idea how to connect my lines, next thing I know I was doodling for the rest of the class. I think that drawing activities are beneficial in many different ways, mentally, physically, and emotionally. It can represent many objects and symbols and increases coordination, concentration, confidence and awareness in self with practice and encouragement.

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Lines gone wild! Doodling and drawing with pencil.
Lines gone wild! Doodling and drawing with pencil – Nejood

Extend those lines!

We really enjoyed the drawing studio where we had to draw and color an incomplete picture/object. In this case it was half a head and a pair of wings. This leaves a lot of room for innovation and interpretation. It is also amazing to see how brilliantly drawn the individual perceptions of the incomplete figures are.

creative exercise
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– Nejood
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– Nimra
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– Rhema

Fox, J. E., & Schirrmacher, R. (2014). Art and creative development for young children(8th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Delmar.

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